Housing For All rally

Council’s budget adds $15 million to housing programs

The DC Council released its budget for a first of two votes on Tuesday, May 15th, and there’s a lot for housing advocates to be excited about. In all, the Council added $15.6 million for housing programs on top of what the Mayor had proposed. Check out the (partial) round-up below:

Local Rent Supplement Program

The Local Rent Supplement Program, or LRSP, is the District’s version of HUD’s Housing Choice Vouchers. These vouchers, which serve households making 30% or less of the Area Median Income, are a subsidy that ensures low-income households never have to pay more than 30% of their income for housing.

The vouchers can either be given directly to residents who then search for housing on the open market, called tenant-based vouchers, or they can be tied to a specific unit that remains affordable and is only available to low-income households, called a project-based voucher.

New investments in LRSP are a big deal—taking vouchers away from residents who need them would be a disaster, so funding for more vouchers is seen as a semi-permanent commitment. Mayor Bowser recommended no new funding for LRSP in her budget, proposing that DC only fund the vouchers it had already issued.

The Council, however, heard calls from advocates to expand LRSP and responded by placing $1.5 million in new tenant-based vouchers and $3.2 million in new project-based vouchers. That’s projected to create a total of 238 newly affordable homes.

Other Programs

The rest of the housing funding added and reshuffled by the Council largely went to housing for residents coming out of homelessness. The Way Home Campaign, a local initiative dedicated to ending chronic homelessness, noted that the Council’s investments were exciting and important, but cautioned that the funding still fell well short of the need.

Among the programs with increased funding were Permanent Supportive Housing, which provides social services as well as housing to residents coming out of homelessness, and Targeted Affordable Housing, often used by residents in PSH who no longer need social services. In all, 616 new units for ending homelessness will be created above and beyond the Mayor’s proposal.
HBC meeting 6
A meeting of MANNA’s Homebuyers Club

Housing Counseling Funds

Another issue that we wrote about previously was the proposed cut to housing counseling funds. These funds are the backbone of programs like MANNA’s Homebuyers Club, which offers a range of services to low- and moderate-income residents getting ready to become first-time homebuyers.

That issue was also resolved, although neither local advocates nor the Council can take credit—Congress passed a budget with full funding for the grant program that makes housing counseling and a whole host of other local programs possible. Advocates must now work to make sure that the local housing department uses those funds for their intended purpose.

Budget Support Act Legislation

Several pieces of housing legislation are also passing with the budget in the Budget Support Act. The Housing Advocacy Team has testified in support of several of these bills, and their inclusion in the BSA is a cause for celebration.

One such bill is the Common Interest Community Repairs Funding Amendment Act, which sets up a rehab fund for condominium and cooperative associations where 2/3rds of residents make less than 60% AMI. Eligible communities will be able to receive up to $100,000 for repair work on common elements like roofs, piping, and electrical systems.

Another housing bill in the BSA aims to keep seniors with reverse mortgages from losing their homes. This bill aims to help low- and moderate-income seniors who fall behind on property tax or insurance payments after taking out a home equity loan (also called a reverse mortgage). Seniors who qualify can receive up to $25,000 in assistance. The bill was prompted by reports of older Washingtonians losing their homes over fees of several thousand dollars or less.

It’s important to remember that the Mayor also had many great factors in her proposed budget, including a big increase for the Home Purchase Assistance Program. The Council preserved that increase, and HPAP looks set to be fully funded through the end of 2019.

Thanks to all the advocates for their hard work this budget season! Feel free to comment with any questions about housing programs in the budget, and we’ll do our best to answer quickly.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Twitter
  • RSS
  • Print

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>